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Home >> Learning Center >> Gemstones

Emerald
TheThe Emerald is probably the best known and rarest member of the Beryl family of Gemstones. Emerald, like other beryl occurrences, has a hardness of 8 on the Mohs hardness scale. Although emeralds have been found in Russia, Australia, and Africa, Columbia is the Emerald producing capital.


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Ruby
The Ruby is the distinguished red member of the Corundum family of Gemstones. Ruby, like other corundum occurrences has a hardness of 9 on the Mohs hardness scale, the second hardest gemstone after the diamond.


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Sapphire
The Sapphire is a multi-colored member of the Corundum family of Gemstones. Sapphire production occurs in Africa, Kashmir (India), Sir Lanka, Thailand, Australia, and the United States.

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Tanzanite
Tanzanite was not considered a gem material until 1967. Originally known as Blue Zoisite, it was renamed by Tiffany's in 1969 to Tanzanite, named after the East African state of Tanzania


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Garnets
Garnet is a diverse group of colored minerals, with color variations from the most recognized reds with brown (pyrope) or violet (almandine) tints to the less recognizable colors of orange with red/brown tones (spessaritite) to the green varieties (grossular, demantoid, uvarovite) with the most notable green Garnet, with the Tiffany's given name of Tzavorite. Other popular named garnets are the Rhodilite and Malaysian garnets.


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Amethyst
A purplish variety of the Quartz family of gemstone occurrences. Commonly a transparent gemstone and available from a light lilac color to a vibrant dark purple. It has a mohs hardness scale of 7 that makes it a very durable gemstone for daily wear. Fine examples may be acquired at moderate prices. Amethyst gem lore suggests that the wearer of this gemstone will enjoy peace of mind.

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Aquamarine
Aquamarine, (Latin for "Water of the Sea." Roman sailors believed it protected them from drowning and ensured a good catch of fish.) is a member of the Beryl family of gemstones. Aquamarine's color is light to medium blue, blue green and the most desirable dark blue. Aquamarine has a Mohs hardness of 7.5.

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Topaz
The family of gemstones known as Topaz comes in a variety of colors ranging from colorless to yellow, yellow-brown, yellow-orange, orange to orange-brown, pink to pinkish-brown, green, the rarer red and more common light blue to a medium to dark blue (the pink and blue color is most often heat treated although there is no way to distinguish a treaded stone from a natural topaz). Topaz is a durable stone with a hardness of 8 on the Mohs scale, usually transparent to translucent.


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Peridot
Peridot is French and derived from the Arabic word "faridat", meaning gem. Ancient Egyptians called Peridot "the gem of the sun," although, due to their brightness, the stones were supposedly invisible under the desert sun. At night, or in darkness, they were said to give off a light all their own.


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Opal
This enchanting stone derives its name from the Greek "opallios," meaning to see a change of color. Ranging from a flash of pastel color to the fiery intensity of the darker varieties, opals reflect light like dew drops in the sun. It should come as no surprise then, that opals have a very high water content, anywhere from 3-33%, but generally in the 6-10% range. The base color ranges from colorless to white, orange, blue, gray and black and in some instances yellow, red or purple. The actual play of colors occurs when a precious opal stone is moved, allowing for viewing in different directions, revealing a spectrum of colors from soft banded pastels to vibrant reds, greens, and blues.


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